Developmental Outcomes in Relation to Early-Life Otitis Media: General Considerations and the Pittsburgh Study This article has been modified from the original and is presented with permission of the publisher. It is based on Chapter 12 in: This work was supported in part by Grant HD26026 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the Agency for Health Care Policy ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 1999
Developmental Outcomes in Relation to Early-Life Otitis Media: General Considerations and the Pittsburgh Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jack L. Paradise, MD
    University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Pittsburgh, PA
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   September 01, 1999
Developmental Outcomes in Relation to Early-Life Otitis Media: General Considerations and the Pittsburgh Study
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, September 1999, Vol. 9, 8-9. doi:10.1044/hhdc9.1.8
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, September 1999, Vol. 9, 8-9. doi:10.1044/hhdc9.1.8
This article has been modified from the original and is presented with permission of the publisher. It is based on Chapter 12 in:
This work was supported in part by Grant HD26026 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research and by gifts from SmithKline Beecham Laboratories and Pfizer Inc.
I am grateful to my colleagues, Thomas F. Campbell, Christine A. Dollaghan, Heidi M. Feldman, Janine E. Janosky, Howard E. Rockette, and Diane L. Sabo for their crucial participation in the Pittsburgh study.
The question whether persistent otitis media (OM) early in life results in lasting developmental impairments remains unresolved and a matter of controversy. The episodic and variable hearing impairment associated with OM, occurring during supposedly “critical” or “sensitive” developmental periods the first few years of life, has been held responsible by a number of authors for various types of developmental impairments found in later childhood, after both OM and hearing loss presumably have been resolved. Impairments of development have been reported in four separate domains: language, speech, cognition, and psychosocial development. However, as discussed below, the studies reporting these relationships have had important limitations, and certain other studies—albeit also characterized by limitations— have failed to show such relationships.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.