Documenting the Impact of Assistive Listening Technology in the Classroom When assistive technology is recommended for an individual or group in a classroom, the professional must be prepared to provide data regarding the impact of the listening system. Teachers, parents, and school administrators require data to document the effectiveness of any recommendation that will ultimately impact their classrooms, children, and ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 1997
Documenting the Impact of Assistive Listening Technology in the Classroom
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Catherine V. Palmer
    Communication Science and Disorders, University of Pittsburgh
  • Send correspondence to Catherine V. Palmer, PhD, Communication Science and Disorders, University of Pittsburgh, 4033 Forbes Tower, Pittsburgh PA 15260 or phone (412)647-1361, fax (412)647-1370, or email cvp@vms.cis.pitt.edu.
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   August 01, 1997
Documenting the Impact of Assistive Listening Technology in the Classroom
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, August 1997, Vol. 7, 9-14. doi:10.1044/hhdc7.2.9
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, August 1997, Vol. 7, 9-14. doi:10.1044/hhdc7.2.9
Abstract

When assistive technology is recommended for an individual or group in a classroom, the professional must be prepared to provide data regarding the impact of the listening system. Teachers, parents, and school administrators require data to document the effectiveness of any recommendation that will ultimately impact their classrooms, children, and bottom line. Traditionally, clinical measurements and questionnaires have been used to document the efficacy of using assistive listening technology for a particular child. Clinical measurements lack the face validity needed to communicate expected results in the classroom. Questionnaires are fraught with problems of bias from the respondees. This article presents a method of structured observation that we have used to evaluate the impact of assistive technology on individual children and classrooms. A case study is presented as an example of the use of this technique.

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