Clinical Applications of Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions Several years ago, during my clinical fellowship year, a girl, approximately 12 years old, came to my office for a hearing aid evaluation. She was accompanied by her mother, who explained that a previous audiologist had conducted a complete audiological evaluation and had recommended a set of be-hind-the-ear (BTE) ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 1997
Clinical Applications of Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Diana C. Emanuel
    Towson University, Towson, MD
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   November 01, 1997
Clinical Applications of Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, November 1997, Vol. 7, 5-7. doi:10.1044/hhdc7.3.5
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, November 1997, Vol. 7, 5-7. doi:10.1044/hhdc7.3.5
Several years ago, during my clinical fellowship year, a girl, approximately 12 years old, came to my office for a hearing aid evaluation.
She was accompanied by her mother, who explained that a previous audiologist had conducted a complete audiological evaluation and had recommended a set of be-hind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aids. The family moved out of the area before the hearing aids could be ordered. I looked over the results, which indicated a bilateral moderate-to-severe sensorineural hearing loss of unknown origin. There was no family history of hearing loss or evidence of unusual pathology. The speech reception thresholds (SRTs) agreed with the pure tone averages and the response consistency was good. Tympanograms were normal and acoustic reflex thresholds were seen at reduced sensation levels consistent with a sensory hearing loss. Since it had been a few months since the hearing test, I wanted to recheck some of the results in order to fit the hearing aids. The responses were consistent with the previous test results and did not seem unusual in any way. At the conclusion of testing, I used a quick trick that I learned at Penn State and use with many of my patients (especially adolescents with hearing loss of unknown origin and clients referred by attorneys). (The actual test we learned involved a low intensity talkover—using “Can you believe this guy has his fly down?”—and watching for an instinctive response from the patient. This statement is only useful for men, however.)
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