Counseling Families With Children With Hearing Loss: Infants and Toddlers Counseling families of infants and toddlers with hearing impairment is typically described as involving the timely and effective presentation of information and the sensitive provision of emotional support to parents, children, and other family members as they adjust to life changes associated with the diagnosis and management of a ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2000
Counseling Families With Children With Hearing Loss: Infants and Toddlers
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Naeve-Velguth
    Department of Communication Disorders, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI
  • Anne T. Heintzelman
    Department of Communicative Disorders and Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   August 01, 2000
Counseling Families With Children With Hearing Loss: Infants and Toddlers
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, August 2000, Vol. 10, 10-16. doi:10.1044/hhdc10.1.10
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, August 2000, Vol. 10, 10-16. doi:10.1044/hhdc10.1.10
Counseling families of infants and toddlers with hearing impairment is typically described as involving the timely and effective presentation of information and the sensitive provision of emotional support to parents, children, and other family members as they adjust to life changes associated with the diagnosis and management of a child’s hearing loss (Clark, 1994;Crowe, 1997;Madell, 2000;Shipley, 1997). Areas of informational counseling may include: explaining of how and why particular audiometric tests are done; describing the type, degree, and configuration of a hearing loss; explaining the typical auditory, speech, and language behaviors of young children and the effects of hearing loss on the development of these skills; outlining options for amplification; discussing educational-communication options for children with hearing loss; and providing referrals to outside professionals (Mendel, 1997). In contrast to the provision of information, supportive counseling involves the social-emotional relationship between the clinician and the family, and is often described as centering on the establishment and maintenance of a trusting clinical relationship. The goal is to develop rapport, such that parents feel comfortable sharing their experiences, asking questions, and expressing their concerns and feelings with the clinician (Luterman, 1991).
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