Providing Counseling and Instruction to Parents of Infants and Children With Hearing Loss: A Consideration of Need The impact of pediatric loss on parents and families has received renewed interest consequent to the recent focus on the development and implementation of universal newborn hearing screening programs. Professionals justifiably are concerned that the identification of hearing loss in infants and young children will be traumatic to parents ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2000
Providing Counseling and Instruction to Parents of Infants and Children With Hearing Loss: A Consideration of Need
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sheila R. Pratt
    University of Pittsburgh
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   August 01, 2000
Providing Counseling and Instruction to Parents of Infants and Children With Hearing Loss: A Consideration of Need
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, August 2000, Vol. 10, 2-10. doi:10.1044/hhdc10.1.2
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, August 2000, Vol. 10, 2-10. doi:10.1044/hhdc10.1.2
The impact of pediatric loss on parents and families has received renewed interest consequent to the recent focus on the development and implementation of universal newborn hearing screening programs. Professionals justifiably are concerned that the identification of hearing loss in infants and young children will be traumatic to parents and that many professionals will be ill-equipped to deal with the emotional and instructional needs of parents and other family members (Matkin, 1988; Martin, George, O’Neal, & Daly, 1987; Roush, Harrison, & Palsha, 1991). Concerns also have been raised about the subsequent impact of parental reactions on the child and the family unit. A concern raised by Bess and Paradise (1994)  and Lang (1996)  is that the early identification process will introduce undue parental anxiety and interfere with parent- infant bonding. Because of these concerns, professionals increasingly have become aware that parent counseling and instruction needs to be an integral component of, not only the (re)habilitative process, but identification and diagnostic activities. The literature supports such a need and suggests that parent counseling and instruction can be effective if implemented properly (Crowley, Keane, & Needham, 1982; Greenberg, 1983; Greenberg, Calderon, & Kusche, 1984).
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