Early Experience With Cochlear Implants Increases Auditory-Visual Integration for Speech Recognition Auditory-visual integration was assessed using the McGurk task (McGurk & MacDonald, 1976) with 34 children who were deaf from birth until they received a cochlear implant (age range 13 months- 8 years). Children who received cochlear implants below the age of 30 months demonstrated more optimal performance as indicated ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2006
Early Experience With Cochlear Implants Increases Auditory-Visual Integration for Speech Recognition
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Efrat A. Schorr
    Department of Human Development/Institute of Child Study University of Maryland, College Park
  • Nathan A. Fox
    Department of Human Development/Institute of Child Study University of Maryland, College Park
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Articles
Article   |   November 01, 2006
Early Experience With Cochlear Implants Increases Auditory-Visual Integration for Speech Recognition
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, November 2006, Vol. 16, 19-23. doi:10.1044/hhdc16.2.18
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, November 2006, Vol. 16, 19-23. doi:10.1044/hhdc16.2.18
Auditory-visual integration was assessed using the McGurk task (McGurk & MacDonald, 1976) with 34 children who were deaf from birth until they received a cochlear implant (age range 13 months- 8 years). Children who received cochlear implants below the age of 30 months demonstrated more optimal performance as indicated by higher rates of accurate identification of the fusion condition on the McGurk task. The results suggest a sensitive period for auditory inputforthe normative development of integration of auditory and visual speech perception.
The integration of multimodal sensory stimuli is necessary for accurate interpretation and understanding of complex input. It facilitates quick and efficient processing of sensory information by reducing the total amount of perceptual information that must be processed (Lewkowicz, 2000). The integration of stimuli that are simultaneously perceived by two different sensory modalities is adaptive, particularly in conditions where the information provided by one modality is incomplete or difficult to interpret (De Gelder & Bertelson, 2003). For example, in situations where background noise or reverberation impairs accurate auditory perception, the availability of visual information from the speaker’s mouth and face significantly facilitates speech perception (Grant, Ardell, Kuhl, & Sparks, 1985; Sumby & Pollack, 1954; Summerfield, 1979).
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