Current Practices in Pediatric Amplification and Early Intervention The field of pediatric audiology has drastically changed since the early 1990s, including, but not limited to, universal newborn hearing screening programs, technological advancements in hearing aids and implants, new and updated audiologic equipment, and research in speech-language-auditory development. A summary of some of the significant events includes: Many ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2007
Current Practices in Pediatric Amplification and Early Intervention
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kristina Rigsby
    Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, National Center for Childhood Deafness and Family Communication, Nashville, TN
  • Tamala S. Bradham
    Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, National Center for Childhood Deafness and Family Communication, Nashville, TN
  • William Dickinson
    Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, National Center for Childhood Deafness and Family Communication, Nashville, TN
  • H. Gustav Mueller
    Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, National Center for Childhood Deafness and Family Communication, Nashville, TN
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2007
Current Practices in Pediatric Amplification and Early Intervention
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, March 2007, Vol. 17, 3-7. doi:10.1044/hhdc17.1.3
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, March 2007, Vol. 17, 3-7. doi:10.1044/hhdc17.1.3
The field of pediatric audiology has drastically changed since the early 1990s, including, but not limited to, universal newborn hearing screening programs, technological advancements in hearing aids and implants, new and updated audiologic equipment, and research in speech-language-auditory development. A summary of some of the significant events includes:
Many changes have occurred in the field of pediatric hearing loss treatment and management resulting in better hearing health care. The purpose of this survey was to examine changes, if any, in services for children with hearing loss as compared to previous surveys reported and guidelines made by the Pediatric Working Group. This survey was designed for audiologists and included questions regarding demographics and training, the pediatric hearing aid selection process, verification, validation, and early intervention issues. The survey focused on children from birth to 5 years old with hearing loss and was fielded to 426 Division 9 affiliates. A total of 99 individuals responded, a 23% response rate.
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