Validating Outcomes and Supporting Our Youngest Patients’ Development One of our primary goals as audiologists is to support our patients in achieving their best communication potential. Our job is not done when the hearing loss is diagnosed or the hearing aid is fit. How we measure and support our patient/family’s progress with this goal always in mind ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2007
Validating Outcomes and Supporting Our Youngest Patients’ Development
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Eileen Rall
    The Center for Childhood Communication, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
Article Information
Development / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2007
Validating Outcomes and Supporting Our Youngest Patients’ Development
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, March 2007, Vol. 17, 8-11. doi:10.1044/hhdc17.1.8
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, March 2007, Vol. 17, 8-11. doi:10.1044/hhdc17.1.8
One of our primary goals as audiologists is to support our patients in achieving their best communication potential. Our job is not done when the hearing loss is diagnosed or the hearing aid is fit. How we measure and support our patient/family’s progress with this goal always in mind is a challenge. While there are many validated tools for measuring outcomes for older children and adults, there is a definite lack of materials for our youngest patients. An equivalent challenge for this growing population, given the impact hearing loss has on communication skills, is supporting or promoting healthy psychosocial development. This article reflects the experiences of a pediatric audiologist in a large children’s hospital, who incorporates outcomes assessment and addresses topics with families to support healthy psychosocial development with children who have hearing loss as part of routine clinical practice. This overview focuses on functional outcome measures that this clinician has found useful in working with children and families and how we can support communication/ psychosocial development for children from birth through pre-school. Others in this volume discuss additional outcome measures (such as speech perception testing) that are used for older school-aged children. The tools detailed are not intended to be all inclusive, but those used routinely in our clinic. In addition, ways to support the psychosocial development of the youngest patients using Erik Erikson’s model of development will be discussed.
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