Music Perception in Children With Cochlear Implants As a result of the widespread use of cochlear implants, individuals with profound hearing loss now are able to hear sounds ranging from a syllable to a symphony. This form of “electric hearing” has been remarkably successful in providing sound to the deaf population and at least 100,000 implantation procedures ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2010
Music Perception in Children With Cochlear Implants
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lindsay Scattergood
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Peabody Conservatory of Music, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
  • Charles J. Limb, MD
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Peabody Conservatory of Music, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2010
Music Perception in Children With Cochlear Implants
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, March 2010, Vol. 20, 32-37. doi:10.1044/hhdc20.1.32
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, March 2010, Vol. 20, 32-37. doi:10.1044/hhdc20.1.32
Abstract

As a result of the widespread use of cochlear implants, individuals with profound hearing loss now are able to hear sounds ranging from a syllable to a symphony. This form of “electric hearing” has been remarkably successful in providing sound to the deaf population and at least 100,000 implantation procedures have been performed worldwide in more than 80 countries (Clark, 2008). Today, it is routine for post-lingual deafened individuals (one who lost their hearing after normal childhood language acquisition) to achieve high performance on language tests following implantation (Lalwani, Larky, Wareing, Kwast, & Schindler, 1998). Deaf children implanted at an early age with a CI usually develop excellent spoken language skills, with placement into mainstream educational schooling (Francis, Koch, Wyatt, & Niparko, 1999). The overwhelming emphasis on language perception in CI users has led to relative neglect of non-linguistic sound perception. Yet, the auditory world consists of many other sounds besides those of spoken language. Of all non-linguistic sounds, perception of music—particularly pitch and timbre—represents the greatest challenge for implant-mediated listening (Limb, 2006). High-level perception of music rarely is attained through conventional speech processing technology in adults or children. Recent technological advances, however, have increased the processing capabilities of modern CIs and hold great promise for music perception and quality of life for children with cochlear implants (Lassaletta et al., 2007).

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