Doing What It Takes: Advancing Outcomes for Children With Hearing Loss Never before in history has there been such opportunity for children who are born deaf or hard of hearing to develop listening, literacy, and spoken language skills equal to normal hearing peers. Today's opportunity exists because of three recent advancements: universal newborn hearing screening, hearing technology including digital hearing ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2008
Doing What It Takes: Advancing Outcomes for Children With Hearing Loss
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Teresa H. Caraway
    Hearts for Hearing, Oklahoma City, OK
  • Tamara H. Elder
    Hearts for Hearing, Oklahoma City, OK
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2008
Doing What It Takes: Advancing Outcomes for Children With Hearing Loss
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, October 2008, Vol. 18, 69-73. doi:10.1044/hhdc18.2.69
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, October 2008, Vol. 18, 69-73. doi:10.1044/hhdc18.2.69
Never before in history has there been such opportunity for children who are born deaf or hard of hearing to develop listening, literacy, and spoken language skills equal to normal hearing peers. Today's opportunity exists because of three recent advancements: universal newborn hearing screening, hearing technology including digital hearing aids and cochlear implants, and auditory-based early intervention or auditory-verbal therapy (AVT). Electrophysiological procedures can be used to screen an infant's hearing within hours of birth to indicate whether further diagnostic tests are warranted, allowing early identification of hearing loss. Advances in contemporary hearing technology—including digital hearing aids, personal FM systems, soundfield FM systems, and cochlear implants—provide improved access to intelligible speech. Consequently, intervention begins immediately as babies are fitted with hearing aids and cochlear implants and listening and spoken language are stimulated during the critical periods of brain neural plasticity (Cole & Flexer, 2007; Northern & Downs, 1991).
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