Coordinator's Column Has the first quarter of 2009 really already passed? I guess time must really fly when we're having fun, right? In a similar vein, has it really been almost 20 years since the FDA approved multichannel cochlear implants for children? As a young audiologist, I was thrilled to hear ... Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column  |   March 01, 2009
Coordinator's Column
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Article Information
Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column   |   March 01, 2009
Coordinator's Column
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, March 2009, Vol. 19, 2-3. doi:10.1044/hhdc19.1.2
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, March 2009, Vol. 19, 2-3. doi:10.1044/hhdc19.1.2
Has the first quarter of 2009 really already passed? I guess time must really fly when we're having fun, right? In a similar vein, has it really been almost 20 years since the FDA approved multichannel cochlear implants for children? As a young audiologist, I was thrilled to hear stories on popular media about a “new and remarkable technology” that would allow people who are deaf to hear speech and environmental sounds. At the time, nobody was quite certain how much the cochlear implant would improve auditory, speech, language, and academic outcomes for children with profound hearing loss. Now, of course, we know from numerous research studies that many children who have severe to profound hearing loss and use cochlear implants achieve speech, language, and literacy outcomes that are similar to their peers with typical hearing.
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