Teaching Children With Hearing Impairment To Listen and Speak When the Home Language is Not English Many speech-language pathologists (SLPs), deaf educators, and audiologists (AuDs) are finding themselves serving increasing numbers of children with hearing impairment (HI) who come from families that do not speak English. The majority of these families are likely to select listening and spoken language (LSL) as the primary method of communication ... Article
Article  |   May 01, 2011
Teaching Children With Hearing Impairment To Listen and Speak When the Home Language is Not English
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael Douglas
    The Center for Hearing and Speech, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Houston, Houston, TX
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Articles
Article   |   May 01, 2011
Teaching Children With Hearing Impairment To Listen and Speak When the Home Language is Not English
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, May 2011, Vol. 21, 20-30. doi:10.1044/hhdc21.1.20
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, May 2011, Vol. 21, 20-30. doi:10.1044/hhdc21.1.20

Many speech-language pathologists (SLPs), deaf educators, and audiologists (AuDs) are finding themselves serving increasing numbers of children with hearing impairment (HI) who come from families that do not speak English. The majority of these families are likely to select listening and spoken language (LSL) as the primary method of communication for their children. This paper will present issues that need to be considered to support develop of LSL in more than one language for an ever-growing population of children with HI in the United States. Specific areas discussed include bilingual capabilities of some children with hearing loss, achievements of children with HI at a few institutions in North America, determining the language(s) of intervention, understanding current models of intervention, and implementing strategies that facilitate successful multilingual learning.

Acknowledgments
Thanks to Jennifer Wickesberg, Becky Gonzales, and Ellen Rhoades for their encouragement and advice during development of the bilingual support program at CHS and Cristina Zarate for pioneering live intervention in Spanish with the children. Thanks to Renee Davis and Sara Norwood for helpful comments during the many revisions of these papers. Thanks to Martha Dunkelberger for her unselfish service as a professional advisor during the progress of the programs at CHS and as a mentor to the author during development of these papers. Most significantly, thanks to the entire staff at CHS for leading the way to new opportunities for children with hearing impairments in Houston, Texas.
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