Spoken Language Assessment Considerations for Children With Hearing Impairment When the Home Language Is Not English Although the most prominent language in the United States is English, the U.S. is not a monolingual country. According to the U.S. Census in 2000, there were over 40 languages other than English spoken by 55 million people, with 34 million speaking Spanish or Spanish Creole. Given projections based on ... Article
Article  |   May 01, 2011
Spoken Language Assessment Considerations for Children With Hearing Impairment When the Home Language Is Not English
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael Douglas
    The Center for Hearing and Speech, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Houston, Houston, TX
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   May 01, 2011
Spoken Language Assessment Considerations for Children With Hearing Impairment When the Home Language Is Not English
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, May 2011, Vol. 21, 4-19. doi:10.1044/hhdc21.1.4
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, May 2011, Vol. 21, 4-19. doi:10.1044/hhdc21.1.4

Although the most prominent language in the United States is English, the U.S. is not a monolingual country. According to the U.S. Census in 2000, there were over 40 languages other than English spoken by 55 million people, with 34 million speaking Spanish or Spanish Creole. Given projections based on population studies and the prevalence of hearing loss in the Hispanic-American population, the number of persons who speak English as a second language will grow substantially over the next several decades. Hence, hearing health care professionals must be equipped to provide services for children who have hearing loss and speak English as a second language. The following article describes special considerations speech-language pathologists, audiologists, and educators should take into account when providing intervention designed to develop spoken language for children who have hearing loss and for whom the home language is not English.

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