Treatment of (Central) Auditory Processing Disorder: Bridging the Gap Between the Audiologist and the Speech-Language Pathologist There is a history of debate and controversy about the assessment and intervention of children diagnosed with auditory processing disorder (APD). Professionals in communication sciences and disorders view APD from different perspectives. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) tend to view APD from the language and literacy perspective, or a top-down model, whereas ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2012
Treatment of (Central) Auditory Processing Disorder: Bridging the Gap Between the Audiologist and the Speech-Language Pathologist
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Velvet Buehler
    University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Knoxville, TN
  • Disclosure: Velvet Buehler has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Velvet Buehler has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Velvet Buehler is a Clinical Professor in the Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology with the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC). She holds dual certification in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology. Ms. Buehler has provided aural-habilitation services to children who are deaf or hard of hearing and their families for 25 years in the UTHSC Child Hearing Services Program. She has supervised practicum for graduate students in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology in the areas of aural-habilitation, literacy, parent counseling and education, pediatric audiology, and auditory processing. Ms. Buehler teaches the Aural Rehabilitation Course, Clinical Education Seminars, and lectures in classes on the above topics. She serves on two cochlear implant teams providing pre- and postcochlear implant evaluations and treatment. Ms. Buehler provides in-services and consultations to professionals. She has presented at numerous regional and national conferences. Ms. Buehler is a certified trainer for the National Educators of Children with Cochlear Implants. Ms. Buehler is an ASHA steering committee member for Special Interest Group 9: Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood.
    Velvet Buehler is a Clinical Professor in the Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology with the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC). She holds dual certification in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology. Ms. Buehler has provided aural-habilitation services to children who are deaf or hard of hearing and their families for 25 years in the UTHSC Child Hearing Services Program. She has supervised practicum for graduate students in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology in the areas of aural-habilitation, literacy, parent counseling and education, pediatric audiology, and auditory processing. Ms. Buehler teaches the Aural Rehabilitation Course, Clinical Education Seminars, and lectures in classes on the above topics. She serves on two cochlear implant teams providing pre- and postcochlear implant evaluations and treatment. Ms. Buehler provides in-services and consultations to professionals. She has presented at numerous regional and national conferences. Ms. Buehler is a certified trainer for the National Educators of Children with Cochlear Implants. Ms. Buehler is an ASHA steering committee member for Special Interest Group 9: Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2012
Treatment of (Central) Auditory Processing Disorder: Bridging the Gap Between the Audiologist and the Speech-Language Pathologist
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, October 2012, Vol. 22, 46-56. doi:10.1044/hhdc22.2.46
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, October 2012, Vol. 22, 46-56. doi:10.1044/hhdc22.2.46

There is a history of debate and controversy about the assessment and intervention of children diagnosed with auditory processing disorder (APD). Professionals in communication sciences and disorders view APD from different perspectives. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) tend to view APD from the language and literacy perspective, or a top-down model, whereas audiologists tend to view APD from an auditory perception perspective, or a bottom-up model. Professionals who assess and treat children with APD need to bridge the gap and merge their different perspectives to plan effective intervention for children with APD. A panel of audiologists who demonstrated expertise in the area of Central Auditory Processing Disorders (CAPDs) developed The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's (ASHA's) technical report on APDs (ASHA, 2005). This report was approved by ASHA's Executive board in 2005. In this report, central auditory processing refers to the efficiency and effectiveness by which the central nervous system uses auditory information. Central auditory processing includes the auditory mechanisms underlying the skills of sound localization and lateralization; auditory discrimination; auditory pattern recognition; temporal aspects of audition, including temporal integration, temporal discrimination, temporal ordering, and temporal masking; auditory performance in competing acoustic signals; and auditory performance with degraded acoustic signals (ASHA, 1996; Bellis, 2003; Chermak & Musiek, 1997; Jerger, 2009). A CAPD is a deficit in processing auditory input that is not due to higher-order language, cognitive, or related factors (Musiek, Bellis, & Chermak, 2005; Musiek & Chermak, 2007). However, children diagnosed with CAPD may experience difficulties in academic learning, speech, language, social skills, and literacy (e.g., encoding, decoding, reading comprehension, reading fluency, and written language).

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