Red Flags: Barriers to Listening and Spoken Language in Children with Hearing Loss To ensure optimal auditory development for the acquisition of spoken language, children with hearing loss require early diagnosis, effective ongoing audiological management, well fit and maintained hearing technology, and appropriate family-centered early intervention. When these elements are in place, children with hearing loss can achieve developmental and communicative outcomes that ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2014
Red Flags: Barriers to Listening and Spoken Language in Children with Hearing Loss
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Andrea Bell
    School of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, College of Health Professions, The University of Akron, Akron, Ohio
  • K. Todd Houston
    School of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, College of Health Professions, The University of Akron, Akron, Ohio
  • Andrea Bell

    Disclosure: Financial: Andrea Bell and K. Todd Houston have no financial interests to disclose.

    Nonfinancial: Andrea Bell has no nonfinancial interests to disclose. K. Todd Houston is the editor of Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood.

Article Information
Development / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention
Article   |   April 01, 2014
Red Flags: Barriers to Listening and Spoken Language in Children with Hearing Loss
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, April 2014, Vol. 24, 11-18. doi:10.1044/hhdc24.1.11
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, April 2014, Vol. 24, 11-18. doi:10.1044/hhdc24.1.11

To ensure optimal auditory development for the acquisition of spoken language, children with hearing loss require early diagnosis, effective ongoing audiological management, well fit and maintained hearing technology, and appropriate family-centered early intervention. When these elements are in place, children with hearing loss can achieve developmental and communicative outcomes that are comparable to their hearing peers. However, for these outcomes to occur, clinicians—early interventionists, speech-language pathologists, and pediatric audiologists—must participate in a dynamic process that requires careful monitoring of countless variables that could impact the child's skill acquisition. This paper addresses some of these variables or “red flags,” which often are indicators of both minor and major issues that clinicians may encounter when delivering services to young children with hearing loss and their families.

Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.