Coordinator's Column This issue of Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood focuses on red flags in the management of children who have a hearing loss. Red flag is a term used across professions to indicate subtle or compelling observations that cause clinicians or parents to question the physical status ... Column
Column  |   April 01, 2014
Coordinator's Column
Author Notes
Article Information
Hearing Disorders
Column   |   April 01, 2014
Coordinator's Column
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, April 2014, Vol. 24, 3. doi:10.1044/hhdc24.1.3
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, April 2014, Vol. 24, 3. doi:10.1044/hhdc24.1.3
This issue of Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood focuses on red flags in the management of children who have a hearing loss. Red flag is a term used across professions to indicate subtle or compelling observations that cause clinicians or parents to question the physical status of the child or any of the components of intervention, such as settings of the hearing instrumentation, or type and level of the services provided. In 2013, the Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery published clinical practice guidelines for the use of tympanostomy tubes in children. Before they are 10 years old, as many as 90% of all children experience at least one episode of otitis media (OM). There is not clear evidence that typically developing children are adversely affected by this temporary condition; however, children with hearing loss are vulnerable the additional hearing loss and OM is a red flag indicating additional and immediate management. As the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's (ASHA's) representative to the panel that developed the guideline, my article is a synopsis of the comprehensive report and guideline. Andrea Bell and Todd Houston discuss several red flags that may signal the presence of factors that will slow or impede a child's progress in the acquisition of spoken language. The ability of clinicians to recognize these flags and to provide an immediate and proactive response can facilitate development of language as well as the many skills that depend upon it so that all can evolve at a developmentally appropriate pace. Young children with cochlear implants often lack the language skills that are needed to alert parents or clinicians regarding changes in their ability to access the auditory signal. Doug Sladen discusses both obvious red flags and more subtle cues that clinicians and parents should be able to identify. Observation of any of these red flags may indicate that it is time to reset the levels of a child's cochlear implant.
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