Monitoring Progress for Children with Hearing Loss Purpose This study investigated average hours of daily hearing aid use and speech-language outcomes for children age 3 to 6 years of age with hearing loss. Method Objective measures of hearing aid use were collected via data logging. Speech and language measures included standardized measures GFTA-2, CELF Preschool-2 ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2014
Monitoring Progress for Children with Hearing Loss
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Monica Weston
    Utah State University, Logan, UT
  • Karen F. Muñoz
    Utah State University, Logan, UT
  • Kristina Blaiser
    Utah State University, Logan, UT
  • Disclosure: Financial: Monica Weston, Karen F. Muñoz, and Kristina Blaiser have no financial interests to disclose.
    Disclosure: Financial: Monica Weston, Karen F. Muñoz, and Kristina Blaiser have no financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Monica Weston, Karen F. Muñoz, and Kristina Blaiser have no nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Monica Weston, Karen F. Muñoz, and Kristina Blaiser have no nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Development / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / School-Based Settings / Articles
Article   |   September 01, 2014
Monitoring Progress for Children with Hearing Loss
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, September 2014, Vol. 24, 74-81. doi:10.1044/hhdc24.2.74
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, September 2014, Vol. 24, 74-81. doi:10.1044/hhdc24.2.74

Purpose This study investigated average hours of daily hearing aid use and speech-language outcomes for children age 3 to 6 years of age with hearing loss.

Method Objective measures of hearing aid use were collected via data logging. Speech and language measures included standardized measures GFTA-2, CELF Preschool-2 and additional item analyses for the word structure subtest CELF Preschool-2 and the GFTA-2.

Results Hearing aid use was full time for 33% of the children (n=3; M=8.84 hours; Range: 2.9–12.1) at the beginning of the study, and for 78% at the end of the study (n=7; M=9.89 hours; Range 2.6–13.2). All participants demonstrated an improvement in articulation and language standard scores and percentiles however continued to demonstrate areas of weakness in sounds high-frequency in nature.

Conclusions Through early identification and fitting, children gain access to speech sounds. Both standardized measures and individual language analysis should be used to identify and support children with hearing loss in language and subsequent literacy development.

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