Language Outcomes in Children With Unilateral Hearing Loss: A Review Unilateral hearing loss (UHL) in children is only recently beginning to be widely appreciated as having a negative impact. We now understand that simply having one normal-hearing ear may not be sufficient for typical child development, and leads to impairments in speech and language outcomes. Unfortunately, UHL is not a ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2015
Language Outcomes in Children With Unilateral Hearing Loss: A Review
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Peter M. Vila
    Department of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO
  • Judith E. C. Lieu
    Department of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO
  • Disclosures: Financial: Peter M. Vila and Judith E. C. Lieu have no relevant financial interests to disclose
    Disclosures: Financial: Peter M. Vila and Judith E. C. Lieu have no relevant financial interests to disclose×
  • Non-financial: Peter M. Vila and Judith E. C. Lieu have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose
    Non-financial: Peter M. Vila and Judith E. C. Lieu have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Articles
Article   |   September 01, 2015
Language Outcomes in Children With Unilateral Hearing Loss: A Review
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, September 2015, Vol. 25, 60-69. doi:10.1044/hhdc25.2.60
History: Received December 16, 2014 , Revised March 5, 2015 , Accepted March 26, 2015
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, September 2015, Vol. 25, 60-69. doi:10.1044/hhdc25.2.60
History: Received December 16, 2014; Revised March 5, 2015; Accepted March 26, 2015

Unilateral hearing loss (UHL) in children is only recently beginning to be widely appreciated as having a negative impact. We now understand that simply having one normal-hearing ear may not be sufficient for typical child development, and leads to impairments in speech and language outcomes. Unfortunately, UHL is not a rare problem among children in the United States, and is present among more than 1 out of every 10 of adolescents in this country. How UHL specifically affects development of speech and language, however, is currently not well understood. While we know that children with UHL are more likely than their normal-hearing siblings to have speech therapy and individualized education plans at school, we do not yet understand the mechanism through which UHL causes speech and language problems. The objective of this review is to describe what is currently known about the impact of UHL on speech and language development in children. Furthermore, we discuss some of the potential pathways through which the impact of unilateral hearing loss on speech and language might be mediated.

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