Satisfaction With Communication Using Remote Face-to-Face Language Interpretation Services With Spanish-Speaking Parents: A Pilot Study Effective communication in clinical encounters is dependent upon the exchange of accurate information between clinician and patient and the use of interpersonal skills that foster development of the patient-provider relationship and demonstrate understanding of the patient's social and cultural background. These skills are of critical importance in the diagnosis and ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2015
Satisfaction With Communication Using Remote Face-to-Face Language Interpretation Services With Spanish-Speaking Parents: A Pilot Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nannette Nicholson
    Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences/University of Arkansas at Little Rock
  • Patti F. Martin
    Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, AR
  • Karen Muñoz
    Department of Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education, Utah State University, Logan, UT
  • Disclosures: Financial: Nannette Nicholson, Patti F. Martin, and Karen Muñoz have no relevant financial interests to disclose
    Disclosures: Financial: Nannette Nicholson, Patti F. Martin, and Karen Muñoz have no relevant financial interests to disclose×
  • Non-financial: Nannette Nicholson and Patti F. Martin have no relevant financial interests to disclose. Karen Muñoz is the associate editor of Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood
    Non-financial: Nannette Nicholson and Patti F. Martin have no relevant financial interests to disclose. Karen Muñoz is the associate editor of Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood ×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   September 01, 2015
Satisfaction With Communication Using Remote Face-to-Face Language Interpretation Services With Spanish-Speaking Parents: A Pilot Study
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, September 2015, Vol. 25, 70-82. doi:10.1044/hhdc25.2.70
History: Received October 18, 2014 , Revised February 6, 2015 , Accepted February 14, 2015
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, September 2015, Vol. 25, 70-82. doi:10.1044/hhdc25.2.70
History: Received October 18, 2014; Revised February 6, 2015; Accepted February 14, 2015

Effective communication in clinical encounters is dependent upon the exchange of accurate information between clinician and patient and the use of interpersonal skills that foster development of the patient-provider relationship and demonstrate understanding of the patient's social and cultural background. These skills are of critical importance in the diagnosis and management of hearing loss in children of Spanish-speaking families. While the provision of family friendly, culturally sensitive services to families of children with hearing loss can be challenging for audiologists and speech-language pathologists, the quality and satisfaction of these services is widely recognized as the cornerstone of patient satisfaction and improved outcomes. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore patient, audiologist, and interpreter satisfaction of the use of remote face-to-face language interpretation technologies in the context of audiology services. Parent participants rated each session regarding satisfaction with the communication exchange, audiology services, and the interpreting experience. Audiologists rated their satisfaction with the communication exchange, relationship with the parent, and experience with the interpreter. Interpreters rated their satisfaction with the logistics regarding the appointment, information exchange, and experience in working with the audiologist. Audiologists and interpreters were asked to identify what worked well and what challenges needed to be addressed. Data from this pilot study can be used to guide future efforts in providing high quality language interpretation services to Spanish-speaking families of young children who are at risk for or have been diagnosed with hearing loss.

Author Note
Appreciation is expressed to Johanna Gillenwater and Jillian Kimberlain at Arkansas Children's Hospital and Elizabeth Preston, Department of Communicative Disorders, Utah State University for their assistance with data collection. We would also like to thank Carlos Muñoz and Ana Caballero for volunteering their interpreting services.
Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Nannette Nicholson, Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences/University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 S. University Ave. Suite 600 UP, Little Rock, AR 72204. Email: nn@uams.edu.
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.